Pretty Maids in a Row: American and Austrian Transferware

Longtime readers of The Thrift Shop Romantic have seen rooms in my small Victorian house evolve, collections amass, and tablescapes and mantles get facelifts. But I don't believe I've ever given any of you a full-fledged peek into the built-in china cabinet in my living room!

It's the place I safely display a lot of my American whiteware pottery from the East Liverpool, Ohio area, as well as its sister transferware pottery from Austria.
Much of the pottery is from the early 1900s, and I've gotten pieces over time at garage sales, flea markets, antique malls and-- yes, absolutely-- even thrift stores!

What I love about it is its rich warm tones, unique, often organic shapes, and the sheer quantity of blossoms.
So much of it coordinates so well with other pieces, making for a case that "more might very well be more"...

I'm always amazed where I find some of these pieces. The central plate, for instance, and rose-hued portrait vase on its left both came from the Salvation Army thrift store!...Now I know they're not everyone's taste. Some might find them gaudy or too ornate for today's streamlined lifestyles. But that's a-okay. It would be really boring if we all liked the same things. And anyway, it may very well be because it's not trendy right now that I was able to get portrait plates like the one on the far left for a single dollar...

This row of pretty plates at the back were also thrift store finds...
They didn't come with the teacups up front-- those were birthday presents from one of my friends-- but my, how they match!

Anyway, that closes the door on this little peek into the cabinet....
I hope you all have a bright and colorful week ahead of you.

3 comments:

Jean Tuthill said...

Your pottery vases and plates are so pretty, I love the pictues on them, so soft and feminine. You have quite a collection and it sounds like you didn't spend much money on them!

Juliana Matthews said...

Jenn - the dusting you must do!

My grandmother was at her happiest when she was 'doing' her china cabinet. She would wait for an afternoon when she was going to be undisturbed, then bring an old sheet and lay it on the floor, then 2 bowls of water - one hot and soapy the other just plain hot water. She would take all her stuff out and using a soft paintbrush, wash everything piece by piece.


There was nothing of terrific value, but to her it was priceless treasure.

Hermgirl said...

Now I know the name of some of the beautiful stuff my dad used to collect! Thanks!

Sadly, much of it's gone now, as my mom felt it was junk (of course, he took it to hoarding proportions, where you can't really enjoy what you *do* have because there's so much of it) and she trashed much of it. But not before I saved a few plates, a lovely pitcher, and a small vase, all of these things I remember being in our house from childhood.